People Ban: Smoking Ban In Italy

Italy Smoking Ban In Italy

ITALY’S 2 MILLION NEW SMOKERS
More than two million people have started smoking again since Italy’s ban in 2005
January 31,2010
By Marco Giannangeli
ITALIANS are so worried about the state of their economy that they are returning in droves to their favourite vice – cigarettes.
More than two million people have started smoking again since the country’s authorities imposed a UK-style ban in 2005.
The law, which made smoking in all indoor public places illegal, bore results at first, with loyal customers choosing not to place owners of their favourite bars and restaurants at risk of massive fines.
But an initial 12 per cent drop in cigarette sales has been reversed, with the latest shock figures revealing that Italy now boasts a record 13 million smokers.
In 2009 alone, four ex-smokers in every 100 took up the habit again.
Last night experts blamed the recession, claiming that the added stress had caused ex-smokers to relapse, while unemployment and boredom were encouraging the young to take up smoking for the first time.
Pier Giorgio Zuccaro, of the health department’s alcohol, drugs and smoking institute, said: “The increase in the number of ex-smokers returning to the cigarette is partly linked to the economic crisis.”
The pressure of being out of work, the anxiety of finding a new job and the increase in free time were all factors drawing back people who kicked the habit, he added.
Lung specialist Dr Roberto Buffi agreed. “It is much easier for those with freer schedules to take up the little infernal cylinder,” he said.
Italy’s treasury is not even reaping the benefits of higher prices. Customs officials have seen a rise in bootleg cigarettes as their fellow countrymen go in search of a cheaper smoke.
In the first few months of 2009, the number of smokers increased by 3.4 per cent while over-the-counter tobacco sales went down by three per cent.


ANSA
Rome, Italy
December 28, 2007
New Year’s partying to end early
No alcohol after 2am in places offering entertainment
Unless there is a last-minute waiver, merrymakers this New Year’s will see their party cut short by a 2am curfew on alcohol sales in restaurants, night clubs and other places which offer entertainment.
The ban on alcohol sales after 2am was imposed by a road safety law passed last October in the wake of a rash of alcohol-related highway deaths, many involving young people, the popular www.winenews.it website recalled.
The law said the 2am deadline was valid for all days of the year and thus included not only New Year’s but also Christmas and Carnival.
The ban during such key holidays has upset a number of sector operators including the owner of Rome’s historic Piper and Gilda night clubs, Giancarlo Bornigia.
”This law only encourages people to try and get round it. The ban, in fact, only applies to alcohol sales in bars and night clubs which have liquor licenses and offer entertainment, while people continue to drink in private clubs,” Bornigia observed.
”Then there are bars, street vendors and supermarkets which can sell alcohol whenever they want. If this ban continues we are going to have to close shop and fire people,” he added.
Winenews also quoted the director of the national wine producers’ association Federvini, Ottavio Cagiano, who recalled that ”this law was adopted on an emotional wave created by a series of tragic events. It was not thought through with sufficient attention and thus on certain key days, like New Year’s, a deadline has been placed on celebrating”.
”What I see happening are people ordering two or more drinks before the bar closes so they don’t find themselves with an empty glass.” he added.
Other sector operators have complained that because of the ban reservations for New Year’s Eve parties are down drastically and many Italians are going to neighboring countries like Austria, Slovenia, Croatia and France where there are no drinking curfews.
Aside from Italy, the only European country to impose a similar ban on alcohol sales is Norway, where sales of beer and wine are prohibited from 3am to 6am, while those of hard liquor are banned from 0.30 am to 1pm.
Other countries, like France and Latvia, have limits on alcohol being sold to be taken off the premises, while in Poland municipal authorities can impose limits on alcohol sales.
During its passage through parliament, the new road safety bill initially did not impose a curfew on nighttime alcohol sales. However, a ban for places offering entertainment was imposed in the House and then confirmed in a second reading by the Senate, which was in a rush to approve the measure before it expired.
Unfortunately, the new law has not produced its desired results with no decline in highway deaths over the past two months compared to the same period last year.

Despite ban on smoking, more Italians are lighting up

31 Jan 2007
PHIL STEWART

ITALIANS are smoking more, even though their cigarettes have gone up in price and a national ban has made it illegal for them to light up in restaurants, bars and offices, according to a new study.

They smoked about a million kilos more cigarettes last year than in 2005, the year Italy became one of Europe’s first countries to ban smoking indoors.

The 2006 rise, reported by the economic research centre, Ref, followed three years of declining cigarette sales and surveys showing hundreds of thousands of Italians had kicked the tobacco habit. It also came despite an average 13p increase in the price of 20 cigarettes.

The study coincided with a call from the European U nion’s health chief for the entire bloc to impose smoking bans.

It also prompted calls for stricter enforcement in Italy and greater effort to educate Italians about the dangers of tobacco. “Since 2005, there has not been an educational campaign. There haven’t been enough inspections,” said Girolamo Sirchia, a former health minister and ex-smoker who pushed for the national ban under the previous centre-right government.


ASSFUMATORI: THOUSANDS OF E-MAILS, SMOKERS WON’T GIVE IN

Milan, Italy, Jan.10 – A ‘soft’ start for ‘the anti-smoking unit’ of Milan’s metropolitan police. We don’t know how many fines they placed. “We only enforce the law – they say – there are no campaigns or task forces”. The figures of this first enforcement day will be issued later on. On the other side of the fence, the Assfumatori website keeps on providing information: thousands of e-mails were sent, showing that smokers won’t give in. “Prohibition fell even in the US at a certain stage” reports the website, which will give a list of ‘smoking’ restaurants at the end of January. Only 10 pct of restaurants in Milan are legally equipped for smokers so far. (AGI)
http://www.agi.it/

Milan, Italy, Jan.10 – A ‘soft’ start for ‘the anti-smoking unit’ of Milan’s metropolitan police. We don’t know how many fines they placed. “We only enforce the law – they say – there are no campaigns or task forces”. The figures of this first enforcement day will be issued later on. On the other side of the fence, the Assfumatori website keeps on providing information: thousands of e-mails were sent, showing that smokers won’t give in. “Prohibition fell even in the US at a certain stage” reports the website, which will give a list of ‘smoking’ restaurants at the end of January. Only 10 pct of restaurants in Milan are legally equipped for smokers so far. (AGI)

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From Forces
Fight for freedom
January 18 – Notes from Italy – Prohibition arrived in Italy last Monday when smoking became illegal nearly everywhere.? Citizens are not amused and compliance is nearly non-existent even though the state has made enforcement of this unpopular ban a top priority.? We will report on the efforts to tank this ban as information in English becomes available.? We are happy to present a report from Carlo Stagnaro, vice-director of the libertarian review “Enclave” and a commentator published in various Italian periodicals as well as American magazines such as National Review.? Of special note in this commentary is how the Italian government is using the smoking ban as the launch to curtail an ever growing number of personal behaviors.

Milan, Italy, Jan.10 – A ‘soft’ start for ‘the anti-smoking unit’ of Milan’s metropolitan police. We don’t know how many fines they placed. “We only enforce the law – they say – there are no campaigns or task forces”. The figures of this first enforcement day will be issued later on. On the other side of the fence, the Assfumatori website keeps on providing information: thousands of e-mails were sent, showing that smokers won’t give in. “Prohibition fell even in the US at a certain stage” reports the website, which will give a list of ‘smoking’ restaurants at the end of January. Only 10 pct of restaurants in Milan are legally equipped for smokers so far. (AGI)

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